Foundations for Analytics with Python: From Non-programmer to Hacker

I’m excited to share that O’Reilly Media is about to publish my new book, Foundations for Analytics with Python: From Non-programmer to Hacker. The book is geared toward people who have no prior programming experience but deal with data every day and are interested in learning how to scale and automate their work.

Foundations for Analytics with Python by Clinton Brownley, PhD

I did not have a background in programming. I learned it on the job because I recognized it would enable me to automate repetitive actions and accomplish tasks that would be time-consuming or impossible with my current skill set. I read countless books, online tutorials, and blog posts in those first few weeks and months as I attempted to get my first program for work to do something useful for me. It’s difficult to fully describe how exhilarating and empowering it was when I finally got the program to work correctly. Needless to say, I was hooked, and I haven’t looked back.

I wrote the book with a few objectives in mind:

  • Be accessible to ambitious non-programmers
  • Be practical, so you can immediately see how you can use the code at work
  • Teach fundamental programming concepts and techniques and also provide alternative, shorter code that performs the same actions
  • Make the learning curve as short and shallow as possible so you can enjoy the fruits of your labor as quickly as possible

The book’s features reflect these objectives:

  • Each section focuses on one specific task, so you can learn how to accomplish that task without distractions
  • Each section is a complete, self-contained program, so you don’t have to remember to combine a bunch of code snippets to make them work
  • In the CSV and Excel chapters, each section of code has two versions, a base Python version and a Pandas version. The base Python version teaches you fundamental concepts and techniques. The Pandas version shortens and simplifies the code you need to write to accomplish the task
  • Uses the Anaconda Python 3 distribution, which bundles the newest version of Python with some of the most popular add-in packages
  • Includes screen shots of the input files, Python code, command line, and output files
  • Common data formats, including plain text, CSV, and Excel files, and databases
  • Common data processing tasks, including filtering for specific rows, selecting specific columns, and calculating summary statistics
  • Chapters on data analysis, plotting and graphing, and automation
  • Three real-world applications that illustrate how you can combine and extend techniques from earlier chapters to accomplish important data processing tasks
  • Both Windows and Mac commands and screen shots

To give you a feel for the book, let me provide a few sections of code from the book and the table of contents. The first section of code comes from the CSV chapter, the second section of code from the Excel chapter, and the third section of code from the Database chapter.  The brief comments after each section of code are for this blog post, they are not in the book.  If you want to see what other topics are included in the book, please see the table of contents at the bottom of this post.

Example Section #1: CSV Files

Reading and Writing a CSV File

Version #1: Base Python

#!/usr/bin/env python3
import csv
import sys

input_file = sys.argv[1]
output_file = sys.argv[2]

with open(input_file, 'r', newline='') as csv_in_file:
    with open(output_file, 'w', newline='') as csv_out_file:
        filereader = csv.reader(csv_in_file, delimiter=',')
        filewriter = csv.writer(csv_out_file, delimiter=',')
        for row_list in filereader:
            filewriter.writerow(row_list)

Version #1 demonstrates how to read a CSV input file with base Python’s standard csv module and write the contents to a CSV output file. In the book, I explain every line of code. This first example gives you the ability to transfer all of your data to an output file. The subsequent examples in the chapter show you how to select specific data to write to the output file and how to process multiple CSV files.

Version #2: Pandas Add-in Module

#!/usr/bin/env python3
import sys
import pandas as pd

input_file = sys.argv[1]
output_file = sys.argv[2]

data_frame = pd.read_csv(input_file)
print(data_frame)
data_frame.to_csv(output_file, index=False)

Version #2 demonstrates how to accomplish the same task with Pandas. As you can see, you simply use read_csv to read the input file and to_csv to write to the output file.

Example Section #2: Excel Files

Reading and Writing an Excel Worksheet

Version #1: xlrd and xlwt Add-in Modules

#!/usr/bin/env python3
import sys
from xlrd import open_workbook
from xlwt import Workbook

input_file = sys.argv[1]
output_file = sys.argv[2]

output_workbook = Workbook()
output_worksheet = output_workbook.add_sheet('output_worksheet_name')

with open_workbook(input_file) as workbook:
    worksheet = workbook.sheet_by_name('input_worksheet_name')
    for row_index in range(worksheet.nrows):
        for column_index in range(worksheet.ncols):
            output_worksheet.write(row_index, column_index, \
                worksheet.cell_value(row_index, column_index))
output_workbook.save(output_file)

Version #1 demonstrates how to read and write an Excel worksheet with base Python and the xlrd and xlwt add-in modules. Again, this first example gives you the ability to transfer all of the data on one worksheet to an output file. The subsequent examples in the chapter show you how to select specific data to write to the output file, how to process multiple worksheets, and how to process multiple workbooks.

Version #2: Pandas Add-in Module

#!/usr/bin/env python3
import pandas as pd
import sys

input_file = sys.argv[1]
output_file = sys.argv[2]

data_frame = pd.read_excel(input_file, sheetname='input_worksheet_name')
writer = pd.ExcelWriter(output_file)
data_frame.to_excel(writer, sheet_name='output_worksheet_name', index=False)
writer.save()

Version #2 demonstrates how to accomplish the same task with Pandas. Again, you simply use read_excel to read the input worksheet and to_excel to write to the output worksheet.

Example Section #3: Databases

Query a table and write results to a file

#!/usr/bin/env python
import csv
import MySQLdb
import sys

output_file = sys.argv[1]

con = MySQLdb.connect(host='localhost', port=3306, db='my_suppliers', user='my_username', passwd='my_password')
c = con.cursor()

filewriter = csv.writer(open(output_file, 'wb'), delimiter=',')
header = ['Supplier Name','Invoice Number','Part Number','Cost','Purchase Date']
filewriter.writerow(header)

c.execute("""SELECT * FROM Suppliers WHERE Cost > 700.0;""")
rows = c.fetchall()
for row in rows:
    filewriter.writerow(row)

This example demonstrates how to connect to a database, query a table, and write the resulting data to a CSV output file. Other examples in the chapter explain how to load data into a database table from a file and update records in a table based on data in a file.

I hope these examples give you a feel for the book. If you want to see what other topics are included in the book, please see the table of contents shown below. Foundations for Analytics with Python is scheduled to be available in May 2016. Please keep an eye out for it, and if you know other people who may be interested please point them to this blog post and the Amazon link.  Thank you : )

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

CHAPTER
Introduction
Why Read This Book/Why Learn These Skills
Who Is This Book For
Why Windows
Why Python
Install Anaconda Python
Text Editors
Download Book Materials
Base Python and Pandas
Overview of Chapters

CHAPTER
Python Basics
How To Create a Python Script
How To Run a Python Script
Numbers
Strings
Regular Expressions/Pattern Matching
Dates
Lists
Tuples
Dictionaries
Control Flow
Functions
Exceptions
Reading a Text File
Reading Multiple Text Files with Glob
Writing to a Text File
Writing to a Comma Separated Values “CSV” File
Print Statements

CHAPTER
Comma Separated Values “CSV” Text Files
Reading and Writing a CSV File (String Manipulation)
Reading and Writing a CSV File (Standard csv Module)
Filtering for Rows
    Value in Row Meets a Condition
    Value in Row is in a Set of Interest
    Value in Row Matches a Pattern (Regular Expression)
Selecting Columns
    Index Values
    Column Headings
Reading Multiple CSV Files
    Count Number of Files and Rows and Columns in Each File
    Concatenate Data From Multiple Files
    Sum and Average a Set of Values Per File
Selecting Contiguous Rows
Adding a Header Row

CHAPTER
Microsoft Excel Files
Introspecting an Excel Workbook
Reading a Single Worksheet
    Formatting Dates
    Filtering for Rows
        Value in Row Meets a Condition
        Value in Row is in a Set of Interest
        Value in Row Matches a Pattern (Regular Expression)
    Selecting Columns
        Index Values
        Column Headings
Reading All Worksheets
    Filtering for Rows from All Worksheets
    Selecting Columns from All Worksheets
Reading a Subset of Worksheets
    Filtering for Rows from Subset of Worksheets
    Selecting Columns from Subset of Worksheets
Reading Multiple Workbooks
    Count Number of Workbooks and Rows and Columns in Each Workbook
    Concatenate Data from Multiple Workbooks
    Sum and Average a Set of Values Per Worksheet Per Workbook

CHAPTER
Databases
Python’s Standard sqlite3 Module
    Create a Database
    Create a Database Table
    Insert Hand-written Data into a Database Table
    Query a Database Table
    Insert Data from a CSV File into a Database Table
    Update Records in a Database Table with Data from a CSV File
MySQL Database
    Create a Database
    Create a Database Table
    Insert Data from a CSV File into a Database Table
    Query a Database Table and Write Output to a CSV File
    Update Records in a Database Table with Data from a CSV File

CHAPTER
Applications
Find a Set of Items in a Large Collection of Excel and CSV Files
Parse a CSV File and Calculate a Statistic for Any Number of Categories
Parse a Text File and Calculate a Statistic for Any Number of Categories

CHAPTER
Graphing and Plotting
matplotlib
pandas
ggplot
seaborn

CHAPTER
Data Analysis
Descriptive statistics
Regression
Classification

CHAPTER
Automation
Windows: scheduled tasks
Mac: cron jobs

CHAPTER
Conclusion
Where To Go From Here
    Additional Built-Ins/Standard Modules
    Additional Add-In Modules
    Data Structures
How To Go From Here

APPENDIX
Downloads
Python
xlrd
mysqlclient/MySQL-python/MySQLdb
MySQL

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2 thoughts on “Foundations for Analytics with Python: From Non-programmer to Hacker

  1. Hi Clint, Heartiest Congratulations.  Worth all the effort.

    Sunil

    From: Clinton Brownleys Decision Analytics To: sunil@nethisinghe.com Sent: Wednesday, March 2, 2016 10:10 AM Subject: [New post] Foundations for Analytics with Python: From Non-programmer to Hacker #yiv9445791134 a:hover {color:red;}#yiv9445791134 a {text-decoration:none;color:#0088cc;}#yiv9445791134 a.yiv9445791134primaryactionlink:link, #yiv9445791134 a.yiv9445791134primaryactionlink:visited {background-color:#2585B2;color:#fff;}#yiv9445791134 a.yiv9445791134primaryactionlink:hover, #yiv9445791134 a.yiv9445791134primaryactionlink:active {background-color:#11729E;color:#fff;}#yiv9445791134 WordPress.com | Clinton Brownley posted: “I’m excited to share that O’Reilly Media is about to publish my new book, Foundations for Analytics with Python: From Non-programmer to Hacker. The book is geared toward people who have no prior programming experience but deal with data every day and are ” | |

  2. Yea, buddy!!

    Looking forward to checking it out!

    Thanks for letting mom and me know!

    Love,

    M&D

    p.s.- hope you’re having a good Wednesday!

    Mom and I are heading out in a bit to meet the kellys and hebbles at habaneros, a new restaurant in Westminster.

    I’ll give you a review when we’ve sample their waresJ

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